Top 5 most Instagram-worthy places in Middlesbrough!

Centre Square
Centre Square is amazing, it’s like a 5 for the price of 1 deal, and you can’t ask for more than that! For the fans of older buildings, you have the Town Hall and Central Library, and mima’s there representing the more modern stuff. Plus you have the Bottle of Notes and the fountain, which are both amazing with a sunrise behind them.


Acklam Hall
You can’t not love the only Grade I listed building in Middlesbrough (FYI, a Grade I listing puts it in the same category of historical importance as York Minster and Tower Bridge!), but where do we begin? The outside of the building? The ceilings? The staircase (😍)? The grounds? Oh so, so many things to love about it!
(Thank you to Love Middlesbrough Lass Claire for letting me use her gorgeous photo of Acklam Hall at sunset!)

Middlesbrough Dock
This is a more recent discovery for me, but one that just keeps on giving. I love water and reflections, and while the water isn’t really still enough for a reflection, it doesn’t stop it being a great place to take photos. It works in any weather too, from sunshine to stormy clouds, but hold onto your hats, it’s windy around there! (There are some great photos of the Dock in our post about the InstaMeet we held in April if you’ve not checked it out already ☺️)


Albert Park in autumn
I love autumn trees sooooo much 🍂. I can’t lie, my photos of Albert Park in the autumn are some of my favourites I’ve ever taken, and I managed to make myself late for work because I was so distracted by taking as many as I could (oops). Because of the way the trees are planted on either side of the path, you’re just walking on a carpet of orange leaves and it’s like the most magical, autumnal thing ever!

Central Library
I’m a sucker for historic buildings (I know, I kept that one super quiet!) so the Reference Library just makes me fangirl like crazy. I spend a lot of time looking up (try it sometime – loads of shops in the town centre have lovely facades on the first floor), and the Reference Library is perfect for that. Just look at those lights! Plus, the outside of the building is pretty special too…

Rare Birds – Voices of Holloway Prison

Natalie Scott is all set to create convincing poetic voices for historical figures and she wants to help you do the same.

Join Natalie on Saturday (10th June) at Middlesbrough Central Library (1.30pm) as she introduces the form of dramatic monologue and then guides participants in using factual materials to voice a person from the past. Then on the evening of Tuesday 20th June, Natalie will be presenting her collection of dramatic monologues to creatively retell the story of Holloway, the notorious London prison from 1852 (when it first opened its gates) to 1955 (when the last woman to be hanged in Britain was executed within its walls).

That performance is at Acklam Community Hub and Library when Natalie will also share some of the fascinating documents she has discovered on her visits to the archives in London and will do a script-in-hand performance of selected poems.

Next weekend sees the start of the 2017 Crossing the Tees book festival. The library services for Stockton, Middlesbrough, Hartlepool, Darlington and Redcar & Cleveland have combined to put the printed word and spoken word top of the agenda throughout the Tees Valley. There are some fabulous opportunities to hear from authors and even join them in workshops.

Locally based poet Natalie Scott will be leading a workshop entitled Rare Birds – Voices of Holloway Prison: Poetry Workshop. She will use examples from her Arts Council funded poetry collection in progress Rare Birds – Voices of Holloway Prison. Participants will be encouraged to create their own convincing voices and there will be an opportunity to receive feedback on their work. Book your tickets below.

Rare Birds

I was so drawn to this concept that I had to ask Natalie to tell me more. So I sent her a few questions by email, I hope you enjoy reading her answers.

Q: Natalie could you first tell us a little about your own story and the kind of poetry that you like reading as well as writing?

NS: I’ve been writing poetry for about twenty years now but have enjoyed it as a reader for even longer than that. Poems that inspire me show an unfamiliar view of the world, a fresh perspective on the familiar and the everyday. They have a sensitive approach to the subject matter and use form not as a way to constrict the subject but to let it say more as a poem than it might as a short story or other longer text. I’m particularly drawn to the dramatic monologue. In fact my recent PhD research centres on the characteristics of this form. I’ve also explored polyphony – multiple voices – and how to use them in longer works. In my first pamphlet ‘Brushed’ (Mudfog, 2009) I created dramatic monologues from the point of view of figures in famous works of art. My first full collection ‘Berth – Voices of the Titanic’ (Bradshaw Books, 2012) retells the story of the tragedy through a range of voices and perspectives. I have also used the form in my most recent pamphlet ‘Frayed’ (Indigo Dreams, 2016) and of course it will take centre stage in my latest project ‘Rare Birds – Voices of Holloway Prison’.

Q: You live locally and it seems to me that there has been a very strong poetry and literary “scene” if I can call it that, for some time now. Would that be a fair assessment do you think?

NS: In the ten years that I lived in the Tees Valley (I’m originally from Durham but have lived in Lancaster, Wakefield and Hexham too!) I have experienced its thriving poetry scene. Over the years I have attended local poetry evenings such as the Black Light Engine Room, the Electric Kool-Aid Cabaret, Writers’ Block and Darlington for Culture’s open mic. I’ve always felt valued and welcome at these events. I am also a member of the Tees Women Poets, a collective which has attracted some of the best female poets in the region to participate in poetry events organised by the group. These networks all have a presence on Facebook which makes it easier to connect with other writers.

Q: I suppose writing can be a solitary thing do you enjoy live events and particularly engaging with people in workshops like this?

NS: I’ve always enjoyed working with people and using creative writing as a participatory tool. I’m a qualified teacher, having completed my PGCE training in Creative Writing at undergraduate level, and I think that this has helped me to find ways of engaging people through poetry. I facilitate many sessions locally with an aim to bring people together and connect through writing. I am currently completing a practice-based qualification offered by the International Federation for Biblio/Poetry Therapy and am being supervised by Victoria Field, one of the only registered poetry therapists in Europe. Last year I established my own initiative Pen Power™ which offers a range of group sessions for people who wish to maintain their levels of mental fitness through expressive writing. I facilitate these sessions in the Teesside area but am hoping to widen the reach over the coming months.

Q: I am intrigued by this workshop Natalie – is this something you have worked on for a long time shedding light on people’s stories through poetry?

NS: It’s a concept I used in my first collection ‘Berth’ which took three years to write and research. As I’m interested in retelling familiar stories in less familiar ways, Holloway Prison as a subject was for me an engaging choice for the next large project. I’ll also be doing a presentation and reading for the festival on June 20th. I’ll be sharing the research I have completed so far and doing a script-in-hand performance of selected poems.

Q: Do you use much actual historical data as well to build up your word pictures?

NS: I am taking care to ensure that any factual information is accurately represented in the collection. I was awarded Arts Council funding to research and write the collection so the research stages are crucial to the project’s success. In addition to the dramatic monologue form, I will be using a wide variety of other poetic forms in the collection such as found and list poems which will use actual documented material sourced from the prison archives to shed light on the topic from a new angle. I will be sharing some of the historical data at the workshop on June 10th and at the Presentation on June 20th.

Q: Do you see it as giving people back a voice that may have slipped off the page?

NS: I hope so yes. Although I have chosen to voice some of the more famous figures from Holloway’s past, the majority of the collection aims to capture the voices of those who have not been as firmly stamped in the history books. The dramatic monologue is a ‘double-poem’ which means that the voice of the poet blends with that of the speaker. I have to take care that my own voice does not dominate; this is one of the challenges for the collection.

Q: Am fascinated by the processes you might use, can it be everything from the vocabulary, to the way the words are delivered that can be used to capture the character of an individual?

NS: The dramatic monologue is a hybrid form because it needs to realistically capture character voice in a way that would sound convincing when performed, but it also needs to be a poem on the page. Therefore many elements have to be combined to achieve the desired result. For example, I am currently working on a poem informed by one of the personal accounts written in autobiography form. From reading this I can get an idea of any little idiosyncrasies with speech and vocabulary so that these can be accurately represented in the poem. The poetic form lends itself well to this, as any repetitions within speech all help to structure the format and give it shape.

Q: Everyone will have heard of Holloway Prison, it was the most famous or infamous women’s prison in the country up to its very recent closure. Is the intention of your own project to shed light on forgotten histories through verse?

NS: Essentially ‘Rare Birds’ aims to retell the story of Holloway Prison’s beginnings and development between 1852 and 1955 in a distinctive and engaging way. My poems will adopt a range of interesting first-person perspectives, including the voices of actual prisoners, staff and other influential people involved in the prison’s history to create a polyphonic retelling. It will also include voices for inanimate objects such as the Black Maria (the vehicle used to transport prisoners) and the two griffin statues above the main entrance gates. In offering such a range of perspectives I intend the collection to have multiple narrators; so rather than having one person telling it from distance (as is often the case with historical texts), I will enable my characters to speak for themselves. Although Holloway Prison is so well-known I still hope that my audience will learn something new about the topic through the way I am approaching it. For instance, not many people know that it was originally a mixed prison, with inmates as young as eight years old serving sentences for crimes such as pickpocketing.

Q: There must have been some notorious women held in this prison over the years, would you say you are drawn to the darker side, people that didn’t necessarily stick to the straight and narrow?

NS: I have a fascination with human behaviour and the psyche in different contexts, so any subject-matter which sheds light on this topic is of interest to me. The collection certainly does not intend to glorify some of the heinous crimes committed by the women imprisoned at Holloway but rather shed light on the backstory of such women. For example I’ve written a poem from the point of view of a woman who was imprisoned for neglecting her children (two of her children died as a result). Whilst we can’t in anyway condone this act, at the time it was committed conditions such as post-natal depression were not fully acknowledged. This particular woman had given birth to three children before turning twenty and had been abandoned by her husband, so my interest lies in how these circumstances might have affected her behaviour.

Q: Suffragettes including Emily Wilding Davies were held at Holloway and force fed, it must have been extremely brutal and quite terrifying for the women being held in prison.

NS: One of the first poems I wrote for this collection was for Emily Wilding Davison. I was drawn to her story and role as a suffragist, particularly because of her levels of strength and spirit which never seemed to wane even though she suffered the ordeal of forcible feeding 49 times. I wanted to draw attention to this because many people remember her for ‘throwing herself under the king’s horse’ at the Epsom Derby (again there is conjecture around this event) but not as many know about the forcible feeding itself. However, I also want to voice the women who did not achieve celebrity status but contributed significantly to the cause. For instance, Katie Gliddon, who was the only suffragist to write a diary whilst in prison (writing materials were not allowed at the time). She penned her thoughts into the margins of a copy of Shelley’s Poetical Works using pencils smuggled into the prison. Her diary offers one of the most accurate views of prison life in the early 1900s. I had the privilege of being able to hold the original artefact when I visited the Women’s Library in London.

So, at Middlesbrough Library can people try and give voice to any historical character?

NS: In the workshop I will be introducing the characteristics of the dramatic monologue first, enabling participants the opportunity to try out the form. They will then be invited to voice a historical character from a selection I will bring to the session.

Q: Do you think it could be good to do some preparation and have somebody and their achievements in mind?

NS: I would suggest coming into the workshop with an open mind ready to try something new. I will provide all the stimulus material required so no need to prepare in advance, unless participants particularly wish to!

Q: I suppose with wikipedia we can all walk around with people’s biographies in their pockets but can poetry bring us closer to their life and times and voice?

NS: Yes, we now have access to a wealth of biographical information – seemingly too much at times! But through poetry, and specifically dramatic monologue, there is a chance to retell this information with sensitivity and thoughtful crafting. In this collection, I have to think carefully about how the form and structure will support the subject matter. For example, I’ve been working on a found poem made from a list of the items some of the first prisoners would have had at their disposal in Holloway. A book called The Criminal Prisons of London by Mayhew and Binny (1862) has been helpful for this as it clearly outlines the specifics of each cell. I let the triadic pattern of the shelves inform the structure of the poem itself, using a three-stanza list form to convey the items kept on the three-tiered shelf. It is in this way that the poetic form can illuminate a topic in a way that other genres cannot.

I would like to thank Natalie for giving that fascinating interview. It really does whet the appetite for the poetry workshop at Middlesbrough Central Library next Saturday (10th June) at 1.30pm. Cost just £3. You can also hear more from Natalie when she is the after 2pm guest on Bob Fischer BBC Tees show on Tuesday 13th June.

Book your tickets for the Saturday workshop here

You can pre-book tickets for Natalie Scott’s Rare Birds – Voices Of Holloway Prison: Presentation And Script-In-Hand Performance at Acklam Community Hub and Library on Tuesday 20th June at 7 – 8.30pm. Cost just £3.

Book Tickets Here

Please click below for information and all the listings for Crossing the Tees book festival, a fortnight of events at libraries across the Tees Valley.

www.crossingthetees.org

You can find more information about Natalie Scott websites, publications, performances, project in progress:

www.nataliescott.co.uk

www.penpower.org.uk

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Between Stations – Crossing the Tees

This June Crossing the Tees Book Festival returns for 2017! The library services for Stockton, Middlesbrough, Hartlepool, Redcar & Cleveland and Darlington are thrilled to once again present the Book Festival for the Tees Valley. As always, there will be something for all of the family to get involved with including plenty of talks, exciting events and kids activities.

On Monday 12th June you can see the first ever performance of poet, Andy Willoughby’s Between the Stations at Middlesbrough Central Library.

The multi media performance is based on Andy Willoughby’s critically acclaimed long poem Between Stations. Andy is on the train between Middlesbrough and Saltburn reflecting back to a journey he made to Siberia with Finnish beat poets whilst passing the remnants of the last steelworks of Teesside. It is a journey given added poignancy by his own survival from cancer.

Andy investigates what it means to be caught between stations in an existential as well as a physical way. A former poet laureate of Middlesbrough Andy has published several books of poetry that draw on local history, travel and mythologies both modern and ancient.

To find out a little bit more background I had a chat with Andy in the room he shares with fellow writer/lecturer Bob Beagrie, high up in Middlesbrough Tower in the University of Teesside.

Q: Can you tell me a bit of background about the Library event, please?

AW: I am performing a show based on my book, Between the Stations. I have been working on the show for a year with film maker Dan Perry and an English and a Finnish musician. So I have been working on it with Anton Flint and Masi Hukari, a Finnish Rockstar. They have composed me a soundtrack and I am performing with the soundtrack and the film for the evening.

I am also going to invite a couple of local poets along to read their travel poems.

Q: Why is it called Between Stations?

AW: Because it is about being between stations, literally. On two trains. It is about a long journey I made to Siberia years ago with the two Finnish poets Kalle and Esa (Hirvonen) to a literary conference in Siberia they invited me to out of the blue in a bar at 4 o’clock in the morning and I said I’d go and I went. (laughs..) It is about remembering that journey while going from Middlesbrough to Saltburn.

I got very interested that on a 25 minute journey you could remember a 6 day journey. Time is not as linear as you think. I did a shorter version of it but then Andy Croft said can you write a full book. And I said yes, of course I can. But it didn’t really come until the steel works closed down because when I was going through the steel works knowing that the blast furnace was finally closed that made it a lot more poignant. So, then the whole thing came together and I wrote the book which is just one long poem, really.

If I did the whole long poem for the show, my show would be 4 ½ hours long. To create the show we did an improvised version in the railway workers park in Helsinki. It was built by the unions. I did it in the bandstand there one afternoon. Massi, Ted and me went down and gave an improvised the performance for the whole book and that is how long it took. Their fingers were bleeding in the end ( Andy laughs).

I worked out what would work on its own for about a 45/50 minutes show.

Between Stations means more than that as well. I had just recovered from cancer when I wrote it. It is also that Catholic thing of being between the stations of the cross. But also the stations of being and nothingness, like the steel works. It was interesting with me riding through the entire history that had died.  But still being alive.

I didn’t know anything before I went to Siberia about the tribal peoples of Siberia but we went to this place called Khanty-Mansiysk where the Khanty and the Mansi still live. They are tribes that were recorded by the Romans so they are pre Roman, ancient tribes. They have a Finno-Ugrian language like the Finns and Estonians. Those languages came originally out of the Ural mountains, as did Hungarian. So there were professors there from all those countries.

There were also some Native Americans there. I met a really interesting Native American guy called Rocktree Boy. He has written one of the most famous Native American memoirs. They were really connecting with these tribal peoples of Siberia, with Shamanic religions that had all been suppressed under Stalin.

But when I got to Siberia I noticed there was Dorman Long written on the rail tracks. The Siberian railway is mostly Middlesbrough steel but not a lot of people know that because it has never been something celebrated. We have celebrated Sydney Harbour Bridge but we don’t celebrate the fact that we built the Trans Siberian Railway, or lots of it. So that felt synchronistic that I was there.

Also in my book (but not in my show) a couple of local English teachers kidnapped me from the conference and asked if they could abduct me with permission beyond the reach of the authorities. They took me round all the town and showed me poor bits of town and they took me to the sacred hill over the town, where the Ob and Irtysh rivers meet and flow into the Arctic.

On top of that hill was a huge steel monument, like a huge yurt, not called a yurt, it is a chum, like a wigwam. I asked what it was. They told me that is what Stalin built to celebrate the iron miners. I said, why? They said they were all Khanty and Mansi people but under communism they all got pulled off the land and shoved down the iron mines to work.

So, there I was all the miles from Eston, next to a hill, like Eston hills, that had been full of iron. The irony wasn’t lost on me.

But then I went to the top of the monument and from the top of the monument I could see for 10 000 miles in every direction across the Siberian Steppes, which was just amazing. In the distance was the taiga, the forest. It is not very difficult to see how a million people could disappear there.

Q: in the Wilderness?

AW: It is just endless. We cannot experience that in England anymore, maybe on North Yorks Moors you can sometimes see a vast, desolate landscape.

In my book I am chronologically going to the stations along our line and reflecting things in my head about, flashing back and forward. Flashbacks to the Siberian journey and being out in Siberia and meeting loads of people.

Q: So people going to this event..

AW: …They can go on my travels with me. They might recognise the journey from Middlesbrough to Saltburn but hopefully I will focus on a few historical things that they will find interesting. And on the ride to Siberia I was with these crazy Finn poets. So, it was really exciting. That part of the book has got lots of beat writing in it and it is comic and manic and to weigh up against the reflective, local stuff.

It is a balance; my show is funny as well. It is important to stress that there is lots of absurd comedy in it, even though I am taking quite a serious historical subject. There is no point in giving people a long, boring message. It is a mixture of humorous travelogue and full on poetic moments of remembering and history.

Q: And very much multimedia, too?

AW: Yes it is definitely multimedia definitely, with lots of angles, we talk about football and about iron and Bob Dylan. On the train I am talking to Bob Dylan because all I had with me on the train was Blonde on Blonde on cassette. I grabbed two things as I walked out the door, my Walkman but I forgot to take any other cassettes. And the only other thing I grabbed was William Blake’s Songs of Innocence and Experience.

On the train I have got the shades of Blake and Russian poet Mayakovsky and also Bob Dylan is following me around with his sunglasses on whispering in my ear every now and then. On a manic journey where we couldn’t really order anything except vodka, milk and dried bits of squid.

There was a translator with us for a bit but he fancied a girl on the train so he disappeared and we just had to get by with the Finns and the tiny bits of Russian the four of us had. It was hilarious.

Dan Perry did our MA but he has also got his own production company Dan Perry Productions.  He has made a few shorts and been to Cannes. I thought it would be really interesting to work with him. So Dan and me went to Finland and took a younger poet, Julie Egdell, who had done our MA. She is performing bits of her show that she has coming out later this year.

It was a good adventure and a proper collaboration. I took Dan to Finland to interview the Finnish poets, so I have got the giant heads of the Finnish poets talking behind me on the screen, as well as me talking. So, it is multi voiced, it is not just my voice. So, it is interesting, experimental, film, comedy, poetry travelogue.

It is the debut of my full work with the film, the finished show. I am putting in for an Arts Council grant to take it out nationally and internationally. I just did it in Estonia, not Eston! They loved it in Estonia, there were 20 000 people deported to Siberia in one night.

So, when I do it round here everyone is going to identify with the little journey through the steelworks and when I do it in Europe, we are the exotic bit and the part they understand is about Siberia train.

Q: And it is important here now because the steel works closure is still all too recent.

AW: It is on the nail. The first drafts were written when they had that temporary shut down a few years ago but it wasn’t enough for me to push it through as a full poem. Then I had cancer and recovered from it and the steel works were closed and with those two things I thought I have enough for a book now.

I am doing a play called Salamander Songs with two other writers. We have done lots of research with steel workers. We have written a play that also has some music by Anton Flint as well. That will be performed at Redcar on 9th and 10th June. We are doing it with Redcar Drama Lab. They are an organisation I helped to set up of former Teesside performing arts graduates trying to get their first experience. I helped them set up an organisation with MA graduate writers and playwrites and performing arts graduates and a few people from the community. I thought there was room for a local theatre company like that, that could help develop new plays. We did the Seaside Shorts Festival, the year before last with that group. There were about ten shorts by different writers, mentored by experienced writers.

On this play I have mentored the other two writers but we have all worked together and written a play and they are going to put it on 9th and 10th June, at Tuned In.

Q: A great venue within sight of the blast furnace.

AW: We are talking about looking at the empty black furnace. In the play three different men go down to look at the blast furnace, they can’t leave it alone after it has closed. And it tells their stories with their families.

The Salamander is referring to what the steel workers call what they put in the furnace in the first smelt and they leave in. The slag in the bottom. It is always in there. They never drain it out. It is what keeps the furnace hot. But it is impure. Then above that comes the ironstone, with coke on top and heat it up. The iron flows out and the salamander stays in.

I got fascinated by the idea that they called it a salamander, a fire lizard. I thought what if he was a character, with sentient abilities.

We have recorded some sections on film with the actor Bill Fellows playing the salamander. Then on stage our team of actors from Redcar Drama Lab will perform the play. But Bill has three monologues in it, which allows us to tell more of the tale. Then you see the way it affects three different steel workers. One has a flashback to the steel strike of 1980.

They left the salamander in this time at Redcar. To mothball it they have to take the salamander out. So, it can never be revived. The death of the salamander is the death of the steelworks.

It is a moment in history and you have to record it with art and interpret it. Hopefully the group can raise some money to take the play up and down the iron seam and maybe travel to other steel towns. Maybe abroad, linking to the rust belts of the world. On my project (Between Stations) I got an Arts Council grant to create the film and the show. I feel like it is important historical as well as artistic work.

I am asking a lot of questions in Between Stations like What becomes of us in these places? Who listens to us in these places? What is left of these places that made all the wealth, now the thing that made the wealth has gone? I am asking a lot of really hard questions and I am asking a lot of really hard questions about identity as well. Like who are we?

I was able to find parallels I wasn’t expecting to find between here and Russia. Thing about how the industrial revolution transformed the lives of all those people but also destroyed all the tribal lands. Then here it saved all these people who came in from the Empire, who were starving.

There is a lot of thought about identity, what Teesside identity is made of. All the steelworkers were telling me, especially the blast furnacemen, we didn’t care where anyone came from, anyone in that job has everyone else’s back. That is the most important thing. A lot of the original steel workers here came from Ireland.

I am not preaching. I am asking. What about this, what about that? I might be ranting but I am not preaching.

Between Stations Live – Monday 12th June

Performance starts 7pm. Cost £5

To book tickets online click here

Crossing the Tees Festival

Reforging The Sampo

Middlesbrough’s Central Library will be hosting an evening of contemporary poetry on Thursday, October 22 from 7pm-9.30pm. Reforging The Sampo is part of the Discover Middlesbrough fortnight, expect mythology, folklore and lots of contemporary comment. High velocity poetry.

Reforging The Sampo with Andy Willoughby and Bob Beagrie is a multi-voiced, musical mash-up of mythological and contemporary social commentary across a landscape of love, loss and endless questing for the shamanic holy grail of Finnish legend.

Developed over ten years this spoken word performance with improvised music and sound effects is unique in contemporary poetry.

Fusing crafted verse with beat- style performance and storytelling, Bob Beagrie and Andy Willoughby take their cue from the National Finnish Epic Kalevala to weave travelogue with love lyrics, folk song and a witty graveyard humour typical of their Teesside roots.

Their raggle-taggle band of folk and jazz musicians help them recreate and conjure up the archetypes of wizardry, animalistic shamanism, ice queens, vagabonds, warriors and lovers lost to the flow in a world of decaying industry, karaoke kings and conveyor belt game show prizes.

Reflecting Beagrie and Willoughby’s long engagement with the poets and culture of The Baltic, the sequence of poems included in this performance have been published in English by Red Squirrel Press and translated and published in both Finnish and Estonian.

Tickets are £3, places are limited and must be booked on 01642 729002.

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ACKLAM HALL SCHOOLDAYS EXPLORED

The three quarters of a century that Middlesbrough’s only Grade I listed building spent as a school will be explored in a talk today.

Fresh from taking on the part fo the architect of the Empire Theatre last Friday night Martin Peagam shifts roles to make the presentation on Acklam Hall’s full 300-year history, with the main focus on the last 80 years.

The talk will take place at Middlesbrough’s Central Library later today, Monday, October 19, twice, first from 1pm-2pm and then again from 5.30pm-6.30pm.

Eighty years ago Acklam Hall entered a new phase in its history when it became a school.
After almost 250 years as the family home of the Hustlers, the Hall became Acklam Hall School, heralding a period of almost 75 years when the building would provide education to the people of Middlesbrough.
In its next phase it is due to become a restaurant, wedding venue and conference centre.

You can expect plenty of school day memories and no doubt lots of entertainment, Martin never fails but to deliver witty and infomative talks. He will be keen to push the positive future the prospects of the building as well as its distinguished past.
The talk complements the exhibition of photographs and other material about Acklam Hall being held at the Central Library.

Attendance is free but places must be booked on 01642 729002.

Children are welcome but must be accompanied by an adult.