Tees Transporter Bridge Visitor Experience

Here at Love Middlesbrough, we love the Transporter Bridge (just in case you hadn’t guessed that from looking at our Instagram 😛), but did you know that you don’t just have to gaze lovingly at it from afar? You can get up close and personal with everyone’s favourite bridge by booking a Visitor Experience tour!

Yep, you heard that right – just hop into a glass lift and fly serenely up to the upper walkway of the bridge for a good look around. Trust me, taking the lift is much more pleasant than climbing the stairs to the top – I’ve done it twice, and that’s more than enough!

Transporter Bridge lift
Spot the lift on the right leg of the bridge!

It’s magical at the top – you can look up and down the Tees, and on a clear day you can see all the way to Roseberry Topping in one direction and Stockton in the other… plus all the lovely Boro sights like the Riverside, Temenos, and the Boho Zone.

Transporter Bridge view Transporter Bridge view Transporter Bridge view

As part of the tour, you’ll get to hear from one of the fantastic staff members who know ridiculous amounts about the bridge and its workings. As if that wasn’t enough, the tour also includes a trip across the Tees in the glass gondola. Plus, if you’re a bit of an engineering geek, you can get a look inside the winding house and see the motors which power the gondola.

We think it’s a great activity for half term – but you’ll need to look sharp, as tours need to be pre-booked for safety reasons (the lift can only hold a certain number of people). It’s also handy to know that the lift and walkway is wheelchair accessible, so no one will be left out.

Book a Visitor Experience tour now!

And because we love a good throwback, here’s what the walkway of the bridge used to look like before all that lovely renovation work took place!

Transporter Bridge walkway
You wouldn’t catch me walking on that glorified chicken wire!

Transporter Bridge renovation
And here’s a cheeky shot I got during the renovations!

So what are you waiting for? A Visitor Experience tour would be the perfect thing to do this half term! 😎

(Tours must be pre-booked as the glass lift can only hold a certain number of people. For safety reasons, tours may be subject to cancellation in poor weather. For full details, see the Middlesbrough Council website.)

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The Very Hungry Caterpillar’s adventures in Middlesbrough!

If there’s one thing the Love Middlesbrough Lasses love (other than food), it’s the Very Hungry Caterpillar! (We’ve been really subtle about it, haven’t we?)  So when we were asked by Middlesbrough Theatre to make a video promoting the Very Hungry Caterpillar’s theatre show, we were absolutely on board!

The brief was to film the Very Hungry Caterpillar in different famous places in Middlesbrough and make a video of it, so off we went (with not one but two caterpillars!) on a trip around the town.  The video will be appearing on your screens very soon, but we thought you’d love to see some of our behind the scenes pics.

We started off at the Transporter Bridge, because there’s nowhere more iconic!

The Very Hungry Caterpillar enjoying the Tees Transporter Bridge

Meanwhile, the baby Caterpillar who’s scared of heights visited Transporter Park, and then they met the dinosaurs at Teesaurus Park.

The Very Hungry Caterpillar enjoying Transporter Park The Very Hungry Caterpillar enjoying Teesaurus Park

There was a lot of climbing around, especially on the Bottle of Notes…

The Very Hungry Caterpillar enjoying the Bottle of Notes

The Very Hungry Caterpillar(s) enjoying the Bottle of Notes

We also stopped for a snack break in Stewart Park, for very good ice cream!

The Very Hungry Caterpillar enjoying ice cream

It’s a hard life going on adventures, so we had to give the Caterpillar lots of time to rest.  You know what they say – never work with animals!

The Very Hungry Caterpillar enjoying the Tees Transporter Bridge The Very Hungry Caterpillar enjoying Stewart Park

As well as getting to explore loads of fantastic places like the top of the Transporter Bridge, the Dorman Museum, and getting fed ice cream, the Caterpillar also got into some trouble, like getting stuck down a chair at Middlesbrough Theatre…

The Very Hungry Caterpillar enjoying Middlesbrough Theatre

…and climbing into the Albert Park cannon!

The Very Hungry Caterpillar enjoying Albert Park

And of course, because it wouldn’t be Love Middlesbrough without cake, we took our two hungry caterpillars (and hungry Lasses) for some amazing cakes made by the fabulous Songbird Bakery!

The Very Hungry Caterpillar enjoying Songbird Bakery cakes

And the Caterpillar(s) didn’t get around by themselves – there was also heaps of work done by the Love Middlesbrough Lasses (and honorary Love Middlesbrough Lass, Matt!)

Love Middlesbrough Lasses (and Lad) Love Middlesbrough Lass (and Lad) 

In case you missed it the first time we put the link in, you can book your tickets for the Very Hungry Caterpillar show via Middlesbrough Theatre.

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Red Wheel National Recognition for Transporter Bridge

Sir William McAlpine officially unveiled the Transport Trust Red Wheel plaque as dozens turned out to celebrate the Tees Transporter Bridge’s transport heritage significance.

The Red Wheel award was one of two presented along the Tees Valley on Friday (April 7), with the Cleveland Bridge-designed Transporter Bridge becoming the 89th site recognised by the Trust, followed by an unveiling at the 90th site – the Stockton & Darlington Railway’s Hopetown Carriage Works.

The Tees Transporter Bridge joins an elite list of transport heritage landmarks recognised by the Transport Trust, the only charity devoted to the conservation, restoration and promotion of Britain’s transport heritage nationally and across all modes of transport – by land, air and water. Other sites in the region include nearby Saltburn Cliff Lift and Shildon’s Soho House.

Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge was awarded a Transport Trust Red Wheel Award at a ceremony today (Friday 7th April)
7-4-17 Pic Doug Moody Photography

President of the Trust Sir William McAlpine, who praised the north east and the region’s spirit, said: “The idea of the Transport Trust Red Wheel plaques is to draw attention and provide information for visitors about interesting, wonderful constructions – buildings, bridges, canals – all over the country.”

Sir William went on to say, “Oh I think it is wonderful, wonderful that the Transporter Bridge has been recognised, or more recognised than it already is because it should be as an almost unique piece of engineering. There is one in Wales that works and one other that doesn’t work. And it is good to know that they are being kept and used and doing a useful thing.”

Tosh Warwick, Middlesbrough Council’s Heritage Development Officer, said:  “The event displayed the enthusiasm and passion for one of the region’s most iconic landmarks and we expect this latest award will generate further interest in our bridge amongst transport enthusiasts across the nation.”

  • More on the Tees Transporter Bridge, including booking information and upcoming events, can be found at teestransporterbridge.com

Information on the Transport Trust, who are currently inviting nominations for other sites of transport heritage significance, can be found at http://www.transporttrust.com/

Heritage Officer Tosh Warwick later gave me a short interview about the significance of the plaque unveiling.

Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge was awarded a Transport Trust Red Wheel Award at a ceremony today (Friday 7th April)
7-4-17 Pic Doug Moody Photography

Q: Tosh, can you tell us a little about the new plaque unveiled today at the Transporter Bridge.

TW: The red wheel is awarded by the Transport Trust. It is one of 89 unveiled across the UK. It celebrates the fact the Transporter Bridge is a really important part of not just Teesside’s heritage but that of the nation. It puts it in a national spotlight.

Q: Today we have heard people discuss both the engineering masterpiece but also not forgetting that it was built so that people could get to work.

TW:  Yes, that is one of the beauties of today’s event; it is about how the bridge has been used rather than just being an icon, which obviously it clearly is. It is about it’s functional role as well. Those ironworkers who would have used the bridge to get over to Bell Brothers at Port Clarence, or getting over to Dorman Long from Port Clarence. And those people that had to carry their bikes over the top when the bridge wasn’t working or to save money. That ordeal of carrying your bike up 200+ steps.

Q: A heavy bike too in those days.

TW: An incredibly heavy bike in those days. It is a good event. The red wheel is alongside the Engineering Heritage Award we have from the Institute of Mechanical Engineers which is also on the side of the newly renovated Visitor Centre.

It is all about what we are trying to do, champion Teesside’s heritage. Today’s one of those events and I am sure we will have an awful lot more in the coming year with the renovation works on going at Middlesbrough Town Hall.

Q: And like the Town Hall this is a iconic structure that can be seen for miles around.

TW: Yes that is right, it is testament to the investment in the Transporter Bridge that it is still here today and it is working today. It is still something that is on people’s radar. It has not been forgotten about. It is not a relic. It is something that people readily embrace, they are very proud of it. You have these stories that when you come back to Middlesbrough you know you are home when you see the Transporter. So, yes it has an iconic and a functional role. That has really come across today with Sir William McAlpine’s visit. To be able to attract the calibre of the President of the Transport Trust, Sir William McAlpine along to celebrate our bridge is testament to how fantastic it is.

Q: And obviously the bridge will have a pivotal role in the future of the area.

TW: Absolutely, yes. It is a key part of our vision for heritage but also visitor and tourism attraction in the area. We have had the new lift installed and the visitor centre renovated. And today we saw evidence that having that lift installed can be part of key events and celebrations and really provide an alternative view of the River Tees and Teesside, a bit more broadly as well. Sir William McAlpine was able to go up in the lift and look out across the Tees and all those different views and those different landmarks and all those key parts of Teesside’s community.

Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge was awarded a Transport Trust Red Wheel Award at a ceremony today (Friday 7th April)
7-4-17 Pic Doug Moody Photography

Councillor Lewis Young, Executive Member of Culture, Leisure and Sport had these words about the plaque and the bridge and Middlesbrough.

In his short speech Lewis talked about how the red wheel.. “speaks about this area, where it is from and where it is going.”

Q: It is a fantastic looking red wheel plaque. It must be a great recognition of the history and heritage of this area.

LY: Yes very much so, I think, we all know and love this bridge and we know that it has national recognition. This is an official sign that it has that national recognition and national significance as well. People talk about the Transporter Bridge across the country and across the world and it shows what kind of iconic significance it really does have.

Q: Something to be proud of?

LY: Very, very much so. We are all very proud of the bridge. We know what it means but it is about selling that story to the wider world isn’t it really. It means, yes, it is our bridge, we are proud of it, proud that we are still investing in it as well. We are proud that it still works. For most of the time. Yes, we are exceptionally proud of it. And it is about using it and using that pride to drive forward other projects and other investment. We are proud of the whole town.

Q: It is an icon for the past but does it have a role for the future?

LY: Very much so. It is a significant part of our cultural strategy, of our regeneration strategy in the Middlehaven area in particular but also in the town we have these kind of attractions and we need to use these kind of attractions to bring in people and to bring in that investment that they will potentially bring. It is about saying yes we are very proud of that cultural heritage that the Transporter Bridge symbolises but it is also about utilising it for the future of Middlesbrough and the future of the Tees Valley really.

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#ETW17: Love Middlesbrough InstaMeet

What. A. Day! We walked, we saw, we photographed. Check out our round-up from the very first Love Middlesbrough InstaMeet. We can’t wait to do it all over again…

Even though we said it on the day (probably too many times!) we’d like to say again a massive thank you to everyone who joined us for the InstaMeet. We’re hoping to do it again very soon, watch this space ❤️

(It’s hard to believe we took these glorious blue sky photos only a couple of hours ago because now we’re looking out the window and there’s a massive thunderstorms and hailstones falling out of the sky!!!)

hailstones

Love Middlesbrough Lasses
x

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Doctor Who and Unseen Boro: Richard Piers Rayner Exhibition Launch

Acclaimed local artist Richard Piers Rayner asks the question: “What do you get if you cross a Time Lord with a Football Club?”

The answer? His exhibition entitled Doctor Who and the Unseen History of Middlesbrough Football Club – all from the same drawing board.

Discover Middlesbrough and pythongallery are delighted to announce the official launch of the first ever Middlesbrough exhibition of Richard’s at pythongallery, Middlesbrough, from noon-3pm on Saturday, October 29.

(pythongallery is situated behind the Club Bongo, in Royal Middlehaven House, 21 Gosford Street, Mbro TS1 1BB)

rpr-1902Born and bred in the town, Richard was official artist in residence at Middlesbrough Football Club for sixteen years. He is the illustrator of Doctor Who graphic novels, award winning artist from DC and Marvel comics and illustrator of the graphic novel, Road to Perdition on which the Oscar winning motion film was based.

There are so many facets to the artist, Richard Piers Rayner, captured in his first ever exhibition in his hometown, Middlesbrough.

rpr-dr-who-2This is an opportunity to enjoy illustrations at close quarter, some reproduced at dramatic scale from that man that has rubbed shoulders with Tom Hanks but is equally at home capturing events down by the Riverside with the Boro.

Richard is, a third generation Boro supporter whose Grandad bought a house in Tavistock Street because of its proximity to Ayresome Park, has been attending matches since a 2-0 victory over Liverpool in the old Second Division in October, 1961.

rpr-junoHe said: “The exhibition contains many the key moments from Boro’s history, including the only depiction you are likely to see of match action from the Linthorpe Road Ground, Boro’s home before the move to Ayresome Park at the start of last century.”

It is not all Boro and football from Richard. He illustrated the 300 pages of the graphic novel Road to Perdition that led to the faithful screen adaptation by Sam Mendes that starred Tom Hanks. His previous credits for the American publishing giant, DC Comics, include work on Hellblazer (for which he won the Best Newcomer Award at the San Diego Comic Convention in 1989), Batman, Swamp Thing, LEGION and Doctor Fate.

For Marvel Comics US, Richard illustrated Captain America: Red White and Blue, and for Marvel UK, Doctor Who: Evenings Empire. He set the latter in Middlesbrough, featuring well known landmarks in the background of the story such as, the Transporter Bridge, Linthorpe Rd and Ayresome Park. The villain’s lair is even based on the old family home in Linthorpe. This book has recently been re-published by Panini Comics and Rayner has contributed a substantial body of new material.

The unique historical narrative of Middlesbrough Football Club presented in the exhibition forms part of a collection of over 400 pieces Richard Piers Rayner has created during his 16 years as their official Artist in Residence. From 2000 to 2016 he built up an illustrated history of the club from 1876 to the present that is unprecedented.

rpr-cassidy-1903Richard also wrote and illustrated the much coveted Middlesbrough FC: the Unseen History, published by Breedon Books in 2008. Its comic book style presentation chronicles the unseen days, forgotten heroes as well as more familiar faces and recent history from the formation of the club in 1876 to the present day.

Every piece of artwork exhibited is available in print form and enquiries should be made, either to a Gallery representative or via email to: RPRart52@gmail.com

rpr-spragg-and-peleSo join Richard this Saturday, everyone is welcome to the launch event when snacks and refreshments will be provided by T P Coffee House.

He added: “Boro fans please drop over on the way to the home game v Bournemouth. This will be the ideal way to get in the mood before taking three points at the Riverside.”

The exhibition continues until Saturday 19th November, so plenty more time for further time travel to view the illustrations of Richard Piers Rayner.

Saturday is a real day of first because also launching on Saturday at noon is the first ever solo exhibition by noted poet/historian and personality about town p.a.morbid.

The Liminal Crawl Space is a series of darkly surreal self-portraits and will be on show until the end of the year in the upstairs gallery.

morbid-python-1pythongallery is open Monday to Friday 9 to 5.30pm and is served by that most hospitable TP Coffee House.

www.pythonproperties.co.uk/galleries/python-gallery

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